Taught by the Christian Witness of the Marginalized in Brazil

  by Koinuma Makiko, Kyodan missionary
Recently, Brazil is attracting the world’s attention as a country that is developing economically. Its shadowy areas, however, cannot be easily seen from the outside.
The history of Brazil began in 500 AD when it was “discovered” by the Portuguese. The intrusion of the Europeans resulted in a sharp decrease of the native population and the importation of millions of slaves from Africa. With the collapse of the slave system that had lasted for 300 years, immigrants from approximately 100 countries were introduced, and consequently, a variously mix-blooded, multi-racial, and multi-cultural nation has been formed. Merry, cheerful, and energetic Brazilians are good at living joyfully even with difficulties.
But the negative historical heritage can be seen in the survival of the power structure from the days of colonial control, which is still persistently the basis of society; the existence of a wealthy and powerful class of people who are corrupt and arbitrary; a tremendous gap between the rich and the poor; and the loss of family culture among the innumerable people of poverty. The area of Alto da Bondade in Olinda City in the state of Estado de Pernambuco in the northeastern Brazil, where I have been working since 2009, is one of the places with extremely bad conditions, far removed from the economic development of recent Brazil. In 1987 Pastor Davi Blackburn, a U.S. missionary, built a Methodist church here. Neighboring it is a nursery school, part of a social service to provide free care for the children of poor families. Unfortunately, however, Davi was electrocuted in an unexpected accident in 1992.
I first met Jane Blackburn, the leader of the members of this church, at the meeting of the World Federation of Methodist and Uniting Church Women in Rio de Janeiro in 1996, and we have been good friends since then. My husband and I worked with the Japanese Church in San Paulo during 1996-2006 as missionaries sent by the Kyodan, using the Japanese language to serve the first generation of Japanese immigrants. In ten years, unexpectedly, we were forced to come back to Japan as my husband was suffering from an incurable disease. He passed away in August of that year. He told me, “You need to accomplish your mission as you want,” and left enough inheritance to support my missionary work.
Being left alone, I made up my mind to work with the Brazilian church using no Japanese language since the church has no Japanese members. Moved also by my friend Jane’s earnest request, I formally set off for my new missionary post in Metodista em Alto da Bondade in March 2009. The scenery of Olinda is so beautiful that UNESCO designated it as a historical city. I have heard that the name “Olinda” is derived from the first colonist’s exclamation and means “How beautiful it is!” But the area of Alto da Bondade, where our church stands, is a place extremely far from “beauty.” Along the bumpy roads littered with garbage, in an unsanitary environment without even a sewer, live poor people who are somehow managing their everyday lives on scant income. Youth, having no hope for the future, easily become slaves to drugs, with its consequences of frequent violence and murders.
In this area overflowing with illness, drugs, alcoholism, violence, maltreatment, and domestic troubles, numerous churches of various denominations and sizes stand side by side, crying for miracles and the help of Jesus Christ. In fact, most of such churches bind the poor people with sundry rules, get them infatuated with church gatherings, and siphon off a great amount of money from them. Their understanding of Christian belief is that of a super-individualistic desire for miracles that never aims for the formation of a community in order to revive human dignity. Instead, these churches seem to enslave people in the name of Christian belief.
In such an environment, we want our church, which consists of some 25 members, to be the one that testifies about the love of God to the people of the area by loving God, ourselves, and our neighbors and by practicing Christian belief. The minister is compelled to be responsible for another church in a neighboring area, and few church members can take leadership responsibility. There are no material, economic, or intellectual resources at all for the church. The church does have one thing, however, which is the simple and strong belief that “God certainly helps us,” and that “Jesus is always with us and gives us strength.” We associate with each other with a humane, affectionate heart and walk together, helping each other, honoring God wholeheartedly, enjoying small things, and thanking God. I marvel at the witness of the members, who never fail to donate literally ten percent of their income to the church, however small the amount may be.
I am a missionary, but I always feel that the Brazilian people are teaching me how to believe in God. How happy I am to believe in Jesus Christ! As hard as I can, I am praying and preaching. More than 180 children, youth, and adults gather together for the winter Bible class, held once a year. Usually the fund to support it is somehow endowed from outside of the church. Still insufficient in understanding the Portuguese language, I accomplish very little in the service by the way of words. Every time I preach a sermon in Portuguese, which is once a month, I endure birth pangs as if I were dying, but as soon as it is finished I am filled with gratitude and pleasure, and revive.
I pray and hope that my presence here may result in a religiously, materially, and economically useful relationship of mutual help between the church in Alto da Bondade and the church in Japan. (Tr. AY)
ブラジル宣教報告
日本キリスト教団宣教師 小井沼眞樹子
 昨今、ブラジルは経済的に発展している国として、世界の注目を浴びるようになりました。しかし、社会の影の部分は外からはなかなか見えにくいものです。
 ブラジルの歴史は西暦500年にポルトガル人に「発見」された時から始まりました。
ヨーロッパ人が潜入してきたことにより、先住民は激減し、アフリカから数百万人もの人々が奴隷にされ、300年続いた奴隷制が崩壊すると、今度はおよそ100ヶ国から大量移民が導入され、様々に混血した多民族多文化国家を形成しています。明るく陽気でエネルギッシュなブラジル人は、困難な中でも楽しく生きることが得意です。
しかし、ブラジルの負の歴史的遺産は、植民地支配の権力構造がいまだに社会の根幹に存続し、富裕な権力者層の横暴と腐敗、貧富の大差、多くの貧困層の家庭文化の欠損であると言えましょう。
 私が2009年から奉仕している北東部ペルナンブコ州オリンダ市のアルト・ダ・ボンダーデ地区も、ブラジルの経済発展とは程遠い、かなり劣悪な居住区です。
1987年にアメリカ人宣教師ダヴィ・ブラックバーン牧師がこの地にメソジスト教会を建てました。社会奉仕の一環として貧困家庭の子供たちを無料で世話する保育園も隣接しています。しかし、不幸にもダヴィ牧師は92年に不慮の事故で感電死してしまいました。
 私はこの教会の信徒リーダー、ジャニ・ブラックバーンと1996年にリオで開かれた世界メソジスト女性大会で出会って以来、友人として交わりを続けてきました。
私たち夫婦は教団宣教師として1996-2006年まで、サンパウロの日本人教会で奉仕しましたが、それは移民した日本人一世への日本語による牧会奉仕でした。思いもよらず10年目に夫が難病にかかり、帰国を余儀なくされ、その年8月に夫は他界しました。
彼は私に「あなたの使命を自由に果たしなさい」と告げ、宣教の経済的基盤も遺してくれました。
 単身になったので、日本語を全く使わず、日本人のいないブラジル人教会で奉仕したい願い、友人ジャニの熱心な招きにも心動かされ、2009年3月から正式に宣教師としてアルト・ダ・ボンダーデメソジスト教会に赴任したのです。
オリンダはユネスコによって歴史都市に指定されているほど美しい景観をもった町です。オリンダとは、「なんと美しい!」という最初の入植者の感嘆詞からとられた名前だそうです。
しかし、教会が建てられているアルト・ダ・ボンダーデ地区はおよそ「美しさ」とはかけ離れた地域と言えましょう。穴だらけの泥の道にはゴミが散在し、下水設備もない非衛生な環境に、日々の暮らしをどうにかやりくりしながら生きている人々がいます。若者たちには将来の希望も可能性も閉ざされていて、たやすく麻薬の虜になり、暴力、殺人事件が頻発することになってしまいます。
病気、麻薬やアルコール依存症、暴力、虐待、家庭崩壊があふれているこの地域には、大小さまざまな教会が軒を並べるようにたっており、イエス・キリストに奇跡を起こして助けてくださいと叫び求めています。そんな教会の多くは貧しい人々を種々の規則でしばり、集会づけにし、多額の献金を吸い上げているのです。その信仰理解は超個人主義的な奇跡願望であり、人間としての尊厳を回復させ助け合う共同体を形成する方向には向かいません。むしろ信仰の名のもとに人々を奴隷化しているように思われます。
 そのような周辺環境にあって、私たちは25名ほどの教会ですが、神と自分と隣人を愛し信仰を実践することによって、地域に神の愛を証しする教会でありたいと願っています。主任牧師は近隣のもう一つの教会と兼牧で、リーダーシップを取れる信徒は少なく、物質的、経済的、知識的資源としては何も頼りになるものがない教会です。が、有るものがあります。それは「神様がきっと助けてくださる」、「イエス様がいつも共にいて力を与えてくださるというシンプルで強い信仰です。そして、人間的な愛情深いこころを持って交わり、元気よく賛美し、小さなことにも喜び、神に感謝し、助け合いつつ歩んでいます。また少ない収入でも十分の一献金を欠かさずにするのには、驚かされます。
 私は宣教師としてここにいますが、いつも私の方が彼らから信仰を学んでいるいう気持ちです。イエス様を信じていることがどんなに幸いなことか。周囲の人々の崩れてしまった人生を回復させるために、一生懸命祈り、伝道に励んでいます。年に1度の冬季聖書学校には180名以上の子供たち、若者、大人たちが集まってきます。資金はいつも外部からの献金によって何とか賄われています。
 私はポルトガル語がまだ拙いので、言葉による奉仕はあまりできません。月に1回の礼拝説教はいつも死にそうなほど産みの苦しみを味わいますが、終わると感謝と喜びに満され、また復活するという具合です。
私がここに存在することによって、信仰的、物質的、経済的に有益な助け合いの関係がアルト・ダ・ボンダーデ教会と日本の教会の間に生まれ、育っていくことを祈り願っています。