Nannie B. Gaines—Teacher, Educator, Missionary, and Founder of Hiroshima Jogakuin

Although the MECS (Methodist Episcopal Church, South) was one of the last denominations to begin work in Japan, starting in 1886, it has influenced the education and the spiritual life of hundreds of thousands of young people since then. Much of the inspiration that touched the lives of students was the result of the lives of dedicated missionaries who left the safety and comfort of their homes to travel to a distant country to work in the field of education.

Walter Russell Lambuth came to Japan from China in 1886 with his father, James William Lambuth, who had been there as a medical missionary. Shortly after their arrival, they received a request from Sunamoto Teikichi, a young Japanese minister, who requested a missionary from the U.S. to help him teach at the school he had begun for young women in his hometown of Hiroshima. Bishop Lambuth’s call to the MECS Mission Board resulted in the arrival of 27-year-old Nannie B. Gaines in 1887. For the next 45 years, as principal and principal emeritus, Gaines dedicated her life to Hiroshima Jogakuin, transforming it from a storefront school for girls to the first government-approved teacher training school for women in Hiroshima. Except for the years during World War II, Hiroshima Jogakuin would have an unbroken line of 73 missionaries, who would serve the school for more than 100 years.

Gaines captured the excitement and anxiety of arriving in a new country and embarking on a new mission: “I am sorry that every missionary cannot be the first recruit to a new and small mission. There is something inspiring in the fact that faith and trust in God are the only means, and it remains to be proven whether the work is to succeed or not.” She arrived late one evening and began teaching the next morning. Sunamoto and the Lambuths had assembled about 30 students for the young teacher—not just young girls, but women married to government officials, army officers, and professional men. This was to be the first attempt at “higher” education for women in Hiroshima.

Gaines’ early years at Eiwa Jogakko were filled with enormous challenges. Teachers had to be found; buildings had to be built; and the anti-Christian attitude among the conservative Hiroshima residents had to be overcome. When Gaines arrived, she not only brought a trunk with her personal things but also a piano, and one of the first things she did was to set up a music department within the school. By 1890, the first school building was up and operating. She was then approached by government officials, asking if she would start a kindergarten as well. She agreed and quickly built a new kindergarten building.

Unfortunately, in late 1891, a double tragedy struck. First the new kindergarten building was irreparably damaged by a late-summer typhoon, which was followed by a late-night fire that destroyed the main school building. However, Gaines was not to be easily defeated, and she continued classes in rented buildings and living rooms of supporters until new buildings could be constructed. Urgent appeals to the MECS Mission Board brought the permission to rebuild, and the girls’ school and kindergarten reopened in 1892. An elementary school was added in 1893.

In 1895, the school changed its name to Hiroshima Jogakko to attract a broader range of students and to come into line with the Japanese curriculum without losing its missionary foundation. By then, the Japanese government had come to realize the importance of establishing schools for young women and looked to Gaines’ school as a model. In 1906, the school required an enlargement of its facilities and took on the status of koto jogakko (girls’ higher school), in accordance with government requirements. The school continued to grow in numbers and influence, with most of the city’s prominent citizens sending their daughters there, which insured financial support and status.

In 1916, Nannie B. Gaines was joined in Hiroshima by her younger sister, Rachel C. Gaines—which must have given her great comfort and support. Although not formally a missionary when she arrived, Rachel took on the teaching and outreach activities performed by other missionaries. In order to provide for her younger sister’s eventual retirement, Gaines put aside part of her own pension to take care of her sister. However, when money was required for the purchase of additional land for another building, as required by the Ministry of Education, Gaines did not hesitate to withdraw the entire amount of $10,000 for the purchase. Turning aside offers of private housing, the Gaines sisters insisted on living in the school dormitory building. Eventually, when a new dormitory was built, a private apartment was designed in the east wing for them. This is where Nannie B. Gaines spent the last part of her life. Rachel C. Gaines was a pillar of Hiroshima Jogakuin for 26 years, staying on even after her sister died. Her dedication to the school was such that it became her life’s work.

By 1919, the school had 700 students and Gaines was considering retirement. However, just then, she was asked by the prefectural and city authorities to create a teacher training program for middle school and high school teachers of English, music, and domestic science. This meant that the school could be upgraded to junior college status, which she was happy to do. But it also required additional buildings and another round of grueling fundraising among friends and acquaintances on both sides of the Pacific Ocean. Miraculously, yet again, the money came in little by little, and once the funding was secured, Gaines could relax once more.

Finally, the time was right for Gaines to hand over the running of her school to someone else. Upon the recommendation of Bishop Lambuth, Rev. Stephen A. Stewart became Hiroshima Jogakuin’s second principal, with Gaines taking the title of Principal Emeritus. This freed her to devote the rest of her life to evangelical work in Japan as well as in Korea and Taiwan, then in the Japanese colonies. She requested an automobile for her work and received what was termed the first “missionary Ford,” which took her to villages around western Japan. She also became active in the Y.W.C.A. movement and became good friends with Kawai Michi and Tsuda Umeko, who were also influential Christian educators for women.
Gaines received several commendations from the Japanese government for her service to education, but the most significant official recognition was her audience with the Crown Prince in 1926, during his visit to Hiroshima. Along with other prominent Hiroshima residents, Gaines was also invited to the royal audience. Wearing a borrowed gown and hat, Gaines represented Hiroshima Jogakuin, giving the school even greater status and recognition.

Toward the end of her life, Gaines had already become a beloved and respected institution within Hiroshima. She was an important influence in the lives of several generations of young women, who would themselves become influential teachers and homemakers. Around this time she wrote, “There is nothing that matters so much to me as the success of this school. It is not simply because my life has gone into it, but because of the work it should do for the women of the Orient.”

When Nannie B. Gaines arrived in Hiroshima as the first MESC missionary in 1887, she was the first of 73 missionaries who would follow her. Gaines Hall commemorates her at the junior/senior high school and Gaines Chapel at the university, but her real legacy is the modern 21st century educational institution that Hiroshima Jogakuin has become.

—Ronald Klein, professor
Hiroshima Jogakin

 

ゲーンス先生―教師、教育者、宣教師そして広島女学院の創設者として

1886年に布教を始めたMECS(MethodistEpiscopalChurch,South)は、日本で比較的遅く布教活動を始めたキリスト教団体ではありましたが、日本の数多くの若者の教育と精神生活に大きな影響を与えました。このような影響を与えることができたのは、祖国での安全で安心な生活を捨て、遠く離れた日本にやってきた宣教師たちの献身的な布教と教育活動によるものです。

ウオルター・ラッセル・ランバスは、布教と医療活動を行っていた彼の父親、ジェイムス・ウイリアム・ランバスととともに、1886年に中国から日本にやってきました。その直後、ウオルター・ラッセル・ランバスは、故郷の広島で女性の教育を始めていた若き牧師砂本貞吉から宣教師派遣の要請を受け取ります。ランバス牧師を通じて話を聞いた教団理事会は、1887年に当時27才だったナニー・ゲーンスを日本に送ることを決めます。それから45年、ゲーンス先生は校長、名誉校長として、広島女学院を小さな英語私塾から広島で最初の政府公認の女性教員養成学校へと発展させるために、彼女の生涯のすべてを捧げました。戦争の一時期を除いて、広島女学院は73人の宣教師と密接に連携しながら、100年以上にわたって日本における女性教育の普及に努めてきたのです。

ゲーンス先生は日本という新しい地で新しい任務につくに当たって、興奮と共に不安を抱いていました。彼女は語っています。「私は神への信仰と信頼によって導かれ、この地に宣教師としてやってまいりました。広島でのわれわれの仕事の成功は、われわれの神への信仰と信頼によって支えられ、そしてわれわれの神への信仰こそが今試されているのです。」彼女は夜遅く広島に到着し、次の日の朝にはもう授業を始めていました。砂本牧師とランバス家の人々は30名の教員を志す女学生を募集しました。彼女たちには、若い女学生だけではなく、政府役人、軍人、専門職業人と結婚している女性たちも含まれていました。これが広島における女性高等教育の始まりでした。

ゲーンス先生の英和女学校におけるは初期の活動は、困難に直面する日々の連続でした。適切な教師を見つけること、校舎の建設、保守的な広島の人々の反キリスト教的態度など、多くの困難を乗り越えなければなりませんでした。ゲーンス先生は広島に到着したとき、身の回りの品を入れたトランクのほかに、ピアノを一台持ってきました。彼女が始めた最初の仕事のひとつは、このピアノを使って音楽教育を始めたことです。1890年には、最初の女学院校舎の建設が完了し、そこでの教育が始まりました。その後、政府の要請を受けてさらに幼稚園を建設しました。

しかしこの直後二つの悲劇に見舞われます。幼稚園の建物は1891年後半の台風によって大きな被害を受け、さらに女学院の本校舎が深夜の火災によって消失してしまいます。ゲーンス先生はこれらの悲劇的な出来事にもくじけず、校舎を建て直す努力を続けるとともに、その間支援者の人々の自宅を開放してもらい、授業を続けました。ゲーンス先生の緊急要請に応えて、教団は校舎の再建築を直ちに了承し、1892年には女学院の建物と幼稚園の校舎が再建されました。1893年にはさらに小学校が建設されました。

1895年には正式名称を広島女学校に変更し、キリスト教精神を維持しながら当時の日本の教育制度に沿った学校組織を整え、より多くの学生を集めることになります。この時期には、日本政府は若い女性の教育の重要さを認識し、ゲーンス先生のこの学校を一つのモデルとしてみるようになります。1906年には、女学院は高等女学校(女性の高等学校)として認可されることになり、設備などの整備拡充が必要となりました。そのころには、広島の有力者たちが広島女学院に娘たちを送るようになり、彼らによる女学院に対する認知と支援は、学校をさらに大きく発展させていきました。
1916年にはゲーンス先生の妹レイチェル・C.ゲーンスが広島に到着します。彼女の参加がゲーンス先生にとって大きな支えと慰めになったことはいうまでもありません。レイチェルは、来日当時は正式な宣教師の資格を持ってはいませんでしたが、彼女は他の宣教師たちとともに、女学院の教育と地域での布教活動に参加しました。ゲーンス先生は、文部省の指導によって、女学院の校舎増築が必要になったとき、ご自分の資産から建築費用の全額一万ドルを提供しています。ゲーンス先生と妹のレイチェルは、個人用の住宅の提供を断り、女学院の学生宿舎で生活を続けることを強く希望しました。その後、女学院の学生宿舎が新しく建設された際に、その一角の東棟にゲーンス先生と妹レイチェルのためのプライベートなお部屋が設けられました。ここがゲーンス先生が生涯最後の時を過ごした場所となりました。レイチェルは、26年間女学院に奉職し、姉のゲーンス先生の死後も女学院の教育につくされました。女学院はレイチェルにとっても生涯をかけての仕事となりました。

1919年には女学院の学生数は700人にまで増え、ゲーンス先生は引退を考え始めました。ちょうどそのとき広島県と広島市は、女学院に中学校および高等学校向け英語教員の養成コースおよび音楽と家政学の教員養成コースを新設するように要請します。これは女学院が高等専門学校(現在の大学)として承認されることを意味していました。しかしそのためには新たな校舎の建設が必要になり、そのためには日本国内のみならずアメリカにおいても大規模の募金活動を行うことが必要になります。ゲーンス先生たちは日々の地道な努力を続け、この募金活動を成功させました。
この仕事を終えて、ゲーンス先生は女学院を後身に引き継ぐ決心をします。ランバス牧師の推薦で、後任にはステファン・A・スチュワート牧師が女学院の第二代校長として着任し、ゲーンス先生は名誉校長となります。これによって少し時間に余裕ができたゲーンス先生は、日本および当時日本の植民地であった朝鮮および台湾において福音伝道活動により深くかかわることになります。ゲーンス先生はこの活動のために教団から自動車の提供を受け、「宣教車フォード」と名づけ、これに乗って西日本各地を回りました。彼女はまたYWCAの活動にも大変深くかかわり、そこで河井道、津田梅子などのキリスト教女性教育者たちと深い友情関係を築くことになります。

ゲーンス先生は、女性教育に多大な貢献があったということで日本政府から多くの表彰を受けています。その中でも特筆すべきは、1926年、当時の皇太子殿下が広島を訪問された際に、晩さん会に招待され、殿下からお言葉をいただいたことです。ゲーンス先生は皇太子殿下ご臨席のパーティに借り着のガウンと帽子を着用し広島女学院を代表して出席しました。このことは広島女学院に対する人々の認識と評価を大いに高めることになりました。

生涯の最後には、ゲーンス先生は広島でもっとも愛されかつ尊敬される人間になっていました。何世代もの世代を超えた多くの教え子たちは、教員として、家庭の主婦として広島の社会に広がっていきました。そのころゲーンス先生は次のように書いています。「この女学院の成功ほど私にとって重要なことはありません。それは単に私が人生のすべてをつぎ込んできたからというだけでなく、女学院の教育が東洋の女性たちの発展に貢献しているからです。」

ナニー・ゲーンス先生が1887年にMESCの最初の宣教師として広島に初めて着任した後、73名のMESCの宣教師たちが彼女の後を継いで日本にやってきました。現在、広島女学院の中学・高等学校のキャンパスにはゲーンス先生の名を冠したゲーンス・ホールが建てられ、大学のキャンパスにはゲーンス・チャペルが建てられています。しかし、ゲーンス先生の本当の遺産は、21世紀の今日においても重要な役割を果たしつつある広島女学院という教育機関そのものなのです。
(和文翻訳:小松正昭)