【February 2019 No.401】Statement on Ceremonies related to Imperial Abdication and Enthronement

by Ishibashi Hideo, Kyodan Moderator

 During the period of April 30 and May 1, 2019, the present emperor is scheduled to abdicate his throne and the new emperor is to be enthroned. We wish to express our opposition to the various ceremonies related to these events, particularly the daijosai ceremony [in which the new emperor makes an offering of rice to the Shinto gods]. Following are the reasons for our position.

 

1. As the various religious ceremonies surrounding the abdication and ascension to the throne are supposed to be religious ceremonies of a private nature conducted by the Imperial Household, having the national government hold the daijosai as a public event gives the impression that the emperor has a separate existence from that of ordinary citizens so leads back to the former deification of the emperor.

 

2. Having the national government participate in the religious ceremony called the daijosai is in clear violation of Japan’s Constitution, which guarantees religious freedom and the separation of religion from government.

 

3. No matter how public funds used for the daijosai are labeled, such expenditures of government funding are a violation of the separation of religion from government, as expressly stated in the Constitution.

 

As followers of Christ who live according to the teaching of Scripture that no being is to be made into a god other than the true God, we express our unyielding opposition to the participation of the government in all religious ceremonies, and particularly the daijosai.(Tr. TB)

 

July 9, 2018

 

天皇の退位および即位の諸行事に関する声明

日本基督教団総会議長  石 橋  秀 雄

 2019年4月30日と5月1日に、現天皇の退位および新天皇の即位が予定されています。私たちは、これに関する諸行事、とりわけ大嘗祭に国が関わることに、以下の理由により反対の意思を表明します。

1.天皇の退位および即位に際して行われる諸行事において、本来は皇室の私的宗教行事である大嘗祭まで国の公的な行事として行うことは、国民に対して天皇が特別な存在であるとのイメージを植え付け、天皇の神格化を推し進めるものとなります。

2.宗教行事である大嘗祭に国が関与することは、日本国憲法が保障する信教の自由および政教分離の原則に反するものです。

3.どのような名目であれ大嘗祭に関わる経費に国費を支出することは、日本国憲法の政教分離の原則に反しています。

 私たちは、神以外の何ものをも神としてはならないとの聖書の教えに生きるキリスト者として、天皇の代替わりに関する宗教的諸行事、とりわけ大嘗祭に国が関わることに強く抗議し、反対いたします。

2018年7月9日

【February 2019 No.401】Living with Illness II

My Disease Makes Life Seem More Precious

by Hoshino Takuya, member Sugamo Tokiwa Church, Tokyo District

I am a 47-year-old man, and since May 2014, I have been commuting to a hospital three times a week for dialysis treatment due to chronic renal failure caused by an, as yet, undetermined condition. I realized that up to now, I have never really prayed to God to cure me, to heal my disease.

In dialysis treatment, blood is filtrated by machine through two tubes inserted into blood vessels in the arm, and each session takes about four hours. During that time, I lie down in bed and watch movies on DVDs, or I sleep. In four years, the number of movies I have watched has grown to be at least 800. There are even times when I am scolded by medical personnel for snoring loudly! I commute to a hospital that is a five-minute walk from my home, so in my everyday life, I haven’t been particularly inconvenienced by having to undergo dialysis. Dialysis treatment involves withdrawing and reinserting blood. Before beginning dialysis I thought it would be scary and painful, but actually, it is relaxing.

Perhaps the reason I haven’t been praying for healing is that in my case, the disease and dialysis treatment itself is not so difficult physically. But I was afraid of living as a dialysis patient and as a person with a handicap in a society of healthy people. I thought, “I do not want to live for so long, just for the purpose of having a long life, if I have to live connected to a bunch of tubes.” I cannot deny that this thought was a reflection of the way I looked at the existence of sick people and people with handicaps who are living now. In order to avoid being seen that way myself, I denied the fact that I was a patient with an incurable disease. I pretended to be a healthy person even though I was a person with a handicap. As much as my physical strength allowed, I began going to a gym, swimming in the pool, and running at night. With a saxophone in hand, I also began going to a bar to participate in jazz sessions. Basically, I wanted to be considered a member of the society of healthy people and thought I could achieve that by distancing myself from the typical lifestyle of a sick person.

I thought, “I do not want to live, if I have to live connected to a bunch of tubes.” And I did not even doubt my assumption that such thinking protects my own dignity. At present there are still just two tubes, but it seems that “life connected to a bunch of tubes” is becoming more of a reality than before. However, I certainly do not think that I want to quit living. Rather, I think that I want to live even more. It is ironic, because I thought that getting close to death meant that as the possibilities in one’s life decrease, one’s obsession with living would also decrease.

Even though I cannot even see what kind of work I should do, and though the reality is that I have this disease, I still think that I want to live. I think the reason I want to live is just because I do not understand well the task of a living person. Perhaps I want to live because the kind of work I thought I should do and the kind of work God is entrusting to me are different. I have discovered that though we only see reality as being “closed,” God announces that it is “open.” Let’s just say the reason is that God uses us as the world’s debris in a way that we cannot even imagine.

Though we know that life and death belong to God, we human beings have a dark desire to control one’s life and death, and other people, and to behave as the ruler of life and death. I think that is the reason for the following phenomenon: when our health is in a serious condition, we request to be notified of the fact, yet it is common for us to hesitate to inform our own close relatives when they are in such a situation.

Living is a process of discarding and giving up on various things but, of course, for a person with a disease, the rate of that process will be faster than that of other people. The number of tubes connected to me will not become fewer than at present; rather the number will increase more and more. Just as I thought four years ago when two tubes were connected to me, the more tubes there are, the more life becomes a precious thing to me. In spite of the way reality appears, we have the strength, the ability, and the will to go on living. I think this understanding itself is from the “Word which was in the beginning,” and it is this that supports me even when I have a twisted view of myself. (Tr. KT)

—From Shinto no Tomo (Believers’ Friend), September 2018 issue

 

病と生きる(2)

星野拓也/東京・巣鴨ときわ教会員

 私は、47歳の男性で、原疾患を不明とされる慢性腎不全(chronic renal failure)により2014年5月より透析dialysis治療のため、週に3度通院をしていますが、今日まで「病気を治してください、癒やしてください」と祈ったことがなかったことに気付きました。

 腕の血管に刺された2本の管を通じ機械で血液を濾過ろかする透析治療は、1回4時間ほどかかります。その間私はベッドに寝転がってDVDで映画を観るか、眠っています。4年間で観た映画は800本以上になり、いびきが大きいと医療者からお小言を頂戴することすらあります。通院先は自宅から徒歩5分の所で、透析による日常生活の不自由はほぼありません。透析を始める前は、血を入れ替えるという治療がいかにも恐ろしく、苦しいものと思っていたのですが、現実はのんびりしたものです。今に至っても病の治癒を祈らないのは私の場合、病や透析治療自体が肉体的に、それほどきつくないということかもしれません。

 むしろ治療以上に私が恐れていたのは、透析患者という難病患者、かつ障害者であることによって、人生においてさまざまな選択肢が少なくなり、社会の周縁に追いやられてしまうことです。言い換えれば、健常者社会の中で患者なり障害者として生きていくことへの恐れです。「延命などのため、管だらけになってまでいつまでも生きていたくない」と思っていました。その思いは、今生きている病人、または障害者といった存在に対する私自身のまなざしそのものの反映であることを否定できません。(自分の)そのまなざしに復讐ふくしゅうされないように、難病患者でありながらそれを打ち消し、障害者でありながら健常者のように振る舞うのです。私は体力の許す限りジムに通い、プールで泳ぎ、夜に走るようになりました。サックスを片手にバーに赴き、ジャズのセッションに参加します。つまり自分自身が病人らしいライフスタイルから遠ざかることで、健常者社会の一員とされたいと思っているのです。そこに在るのは健常者社会に対する肯定に、他なりません。

 「管だらけになってまで生きていたくない」それが自らの尊厳を守ることだと疑いもしませんでした。しかし、現在2本とはいえ以前よりも管だらけに近くなったのですが、決して生きるのをやめたいなどとは思わず、むしろより生きていたいと思う。私の考えでは死の側に近づくことは、人生における可能性が狭まる分、生への執着も薄れてくるはずでしたのに、おかしな話です。

 なすべき働きも見えない、病という現実の中にある、にもかかわらず生きていたいと思うのは、結局私は生きている者の仕事ということについて、よくわかっていないからだと思うのです。私がなすべき仕事だと思っていたものと、神に委ねられた仕事とが異なっているからこそ、生きていたいと思うのかもしれません。神は私たちが「閉ざされた」と見るしかない現実に、「開かれた」と告知されることを知りました。私たちが思いもよらない仕方で神が私たち自身を世界の破片として用いてくださるが故だと言えましょう。

 生死が神に属するものであると知っていながら、人間にはどこかで自分や他者の命に対して操作を働きたい、命の主として振る舞いたい暗い欲望があるのでしょう。自らが重篤な状態にある場合は告知してもらいたいと願いながら、自分の身内には、告知をためらうことが多いのもそのためだと思います。

 生きていくことはいろいろなものを捨て、諦めていく過程ではありますが、病にある人はそのスピードが周りの人よりも速いはずです。私につながれた管は今より減ることはなく、どんどん増えていくでしょう。4年前、2本の管につながれて思い至ったように、管が増えれば増えるほど、いのちが一層愛いとおしいものになっていくのでしょう。私たちには、(現実の姿)にもかかわらず生きていくことのできる力、働きがある。思いがある。これこそが私自身の澱よどんだまなざしに、どこまでも抗っていくことのできる「はじめにあったことば」なのではないかと思うのです。(信徒の友9月号より)

【February 2019 No.401】60th Ou District Retreat Highlights History and Hope

by Hirasawa Noboru, pastor Morioka Matsuzono Church

It is with a grateful heart that I make this report on our annual Ou District Retreat from July 30 to Aug. 1. It was held at the Yumori Hotel Kaikan in Tsunagi hot spa area. The main speaker was Fujimoto Mitsuru, pastor of Immanuel General Mission Takatsu Church. The theme of the retreat was “A Church Living In Hope; Learning From History.” The lecture titles were “The Gospel Shared in the Course of Our Calling” and “Hope in God, Hope in Us.” The retreat began with a message by Muraoka Hiroshi, pastor of Hirosaki Church and chair of the Commission on Ou District’s Commission on Mission.

While introducing himself and sharing with us his relationship with the Kyodan, in his first lecture Fujimoto spoke about missionaries who were called to evangelism in Japan. He pointed out that our journey in mission begins when we encounter Jesus Christ and that mission itself is the work of Jesus Christ. Then he spoke about Paul: how he was chosen and how, in the midst of hardships, he continued in hope to follow Jesus and pass on the baton of mission and evangelism.

In his second lecture, Fujimoto challenged us by asking if we were not much like the early disciples who, when told to go to the other side of the lake, lost sight of Jesus while looking at the stormy sea. The church in Japan, which seems to be struggling in its evangelistic mission, is faced with what is called the “2030 Dilemma”: decreasing number of pastors, aging congregations, and fewer children. However, our mission is Christ’s mission, and he walks with us and shares in the hardships we face. Fujimoto continually stressed to us that our hope is in Christ, and his impassioned words energized and encouraged all of us.

For our optional tour, we visited four churches in Morioka, using a microbus and a minivan. Over 40 participants joined us, and we visited Yotsuya Church (Roman Catholic), Uchimaru Church (Kyodan), Morioka Anglican Church, and Morioka Orthodox Church in Japan. During our visits, we were able to hear about the traditions of each church and the challenges they are facing. The decline in membership and pastors was mentioned. We felt the seriousness of the problems, but we were grateful for the warm welcome we received at each church. The participants said that the tour was a good experience.

There were also three workshops. One dealt with cults and possible countermeasures; another dealt with the problems connected to the nuclear fuel cycle; and the third workshop dealt with sexual discrimination. These workshops were followed by a full group discussion and closing worship. I give thanks for God’s guidance and blessings throughout the retreat.

* * *

Ou District Children’s Retreat, A Welcoming Event

by Kato Naoki, pastor Kitakami Church

As children gathered in the tatami (rice-mat) room on the first day of the Ou District Retreat, you could see the mixture of expectation and tension in their facial expressions. Among the three staff members, the feeling was the same. The “Retreat for Children” began with three youngsters, varying in age from the last year of kindergarten to junior high school, who sat awkwardly at a table. However, after listening to Pastor Matsuura Yusuke of Shimonohashi Church speak about “Shalom” (peace), then working together to make attractive door plates, there were comfortable smiles on the faces of everyone.

On the second day we went outside, in spite of some concern about the heat. In front of us was a public square with a water fountain. It wasn’t long before the children were playing together in the water—at first up to their ankles, then up to their knees, and finally, getting their clothes wet. One of our staff, Sato Midori, member of Kitakami Church got into the water with the children. During the break afterward, everyone tried different challenges on the adventure playground next to the square.

On the third day, the children and staff used a variety of rubber stamps in various sizes and shapes to make colorful images on a large piece of paper as we recalled our experiences during the retreat. In between the stamps we attached origami and pictures that reminded us of what we had seen and shared during our three days together. We were able to create a work that brought smiles and reflected the joys we had experienced. The junior high student who had gotten sick was able to rejoin us, bringing our three days together to a very happy conclusion. I should add that some of the children younger than five, were in the nursery that shared the same room with us.

I give thanks to Jesus, to the churches, and to the families for sending their children to participate in our retreat. (Tr. JS)

From Ou Kyoku Tsushin (Ou District News) , No. 325 Summarized by KNL Editor Kawakami Yoshiko

 

奥羽教区全体修養会報告

   盛岡松園教会 平澤 昇牧師

 今年も奥羽教区全体修養会を、7月30~8月1日に開催することが出来ました。心から感謝いたします。会場はつなぎ温泉、「湯守ホテル大観」、講師は藤本満先生(インマヌエル総合伝道団高津教会牧師)、主題は「希望に生きる教会~歴史に学ぶ」でした。講演は「使命のうちに伝えられた福音」と「希望は神に、希望は私たちに」です。

 宣教部長の村岡博史牧師(弘前教会)のメッセージで始まり、講演一では、藤本先生が自己紹介や日本基督教団との関係などにも触れ れ、日本伝道へと選ばれた宣教師について語られました。また、主イエスとの出会いからすべての歩みが始まることを通して、宣教は主イエスの働きであること。そして、パウロが選ばれ、パウロは試練の中にあっても希望をもって主イエスを見上げ、宣教に励み、宣教のバトンを繋いだことが語られました。

 講演二では、「向こう岸に渡ろう」と語る主イエスに対して、同船している私たちは嵐に目を奪われて、共にいる主イエスを見失っていないか問われました。

 伝道不振の日本の教会は、2030年問題「牧師の減少、高齢化、少子化」と暗くなることばかりですが、宣教命令をする主イエスが共にいて、苦しみを共有されています。教会の希望は主イエスにあると力強く語られました。講師の熱い語りは、聴衆の力となり希望となりました。

 「オプションツアー」では、マイクロバスとミニバン二台で盛岡の街の教会めぐりをしました。参加人数40名を超え、カトリック四ツ家教会、日本基督教団内丸教会、日本聖公会盛岡聖公会、盛岡ハリストス正教会の四つの教会を巡りました。それぞれの伝統や、現在の課題などを聞くことが出来ました。信徒の減少、教職の減少を挙げていて、問題の深さを感じましたが、いずれの教会も快く見学させて頂き、本当に感謝でした。参加者からも「良い経験でした。」と喜びの声が聞かれました。

 「ワークショップ」では「カルト問題対策」「核燃料サイクル問題」「性差別問題」と大きな大切なテーマを行いました。全体協議、最後の閉会礼拝の時まで守られましたことを心から感謝します。

 

「大歓迎、こども修養会」

北上教会 加藤直樹

 修養会の一日目、講演会場に近い和室に集まった子どもたちは、期待と緊張の表情でした。迎えるスタッフ三名も、歓迎と緊張の気持ちでいっぱいでした。「こども修養会」は、年長から中学生までの幅広い年代の子どもたち三名とテーブルを囲んで、まだぎこちない雰囲気の中、スタートしました。けれども、松浦牧師から“シャローム(平和)”のお話しを聞き、かわいくてかっこいいドアプレートの工作をする時には、柔らかい笑顔になっていました。

 二日目は、少し暑いかなと心配しながらも外に出ました。目の前に広がる噴水広場で、くるぶし、ひざ、そしてついに洋服もびしょぬれにして遊びました。スタッフの、みどりさんも子どもたちと一緒に水の中へ。休憩と水分補給時間をはさみ、噴水横のアスレチックにも挑戦しました。いかだでは、子どもたち三人が力を合わせて、何度も回して遊びました。

 三日目は、一緒に過ごした三日間を思い出しながら、全員で一つのものを作りました。 子どもたちやスタッフが、大きさや形も様々な、色とりどりの手のスタンプを(大きな紙に)押しました。スタンプの間には、この三日間で一緒に見たものの絵や折り紙がいっぱいに貼られ、笑顔になれる思い出が、ぎゅっとつまった作品を一緒に作ることができました。体調不良でダウンしていた中学生も合流でき、本当に嬉しい三日目となりました。

 同室では五歳以下の数名の託児が行われました。子どもを送り出してくださったイエス様に、教会に、家族に感謝です。
(奥羽教区報No.325より)

【February 2019 No.401】From the General Secretary’s Desk: The Life of Takami Toshihiro, Founder of Asian Rural Institute Rural Leaders Training Center

As we enter the new year of 2019, we hear many joyful reports from Kyodan churches of people who have been baptized at Christmas, joining together with those already experiencing resurrection life in Christ. At this time, when the aging of church members leads to an increasingly reduced ability to engage in evangelism and when Japanese society is increasingly apathetic toward or skeptical of religion, it is a great encouragement to hear these reports of new life in Christ from these churches. We pray that God will use these newly reborn lives as his instruments to be ambassadors of reconciliation in this world.

With this feeling in mind I think of Rev. Takami Toshihiro, who passed away in September 2018 at the age of 91, and the diligent work he did in training agricultural leaders from Asia, Africa, the Pacific Islands, South America, and elsewhere at Asian Rural Institute (ARI), which he founded. On Dec. 16, graduates and supporters from all over the world gathered together at ARI with people from around Japan who are connected to the institute to commemorate his life and thank God for raising up this servant to do his work.

Takami was born in Bujun, Manchuria (Japanese puppet state, now in China), and after World War II, was repatriated to Japan. Due to poverty, he ended up living and training at a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto while attending middle school. After graduation, he did manual labor in businesses, including working as a longshoreman and in a salt factory. Later, he had the opportunity to work as a cook in the home of a missionary family, and it was there that he encountered Christ. Thus, he had quite a varied life as a young person, culminating in his conversion and baptism as a Christian. As he dedicated his life to Christ, he felt the call into full-time ministry and was able to go to the United States to study, first at Doane University in Nebraska, then at the University of Connecticut, and finally at Yale Divinity School.

After returning to Japan, he found his calling was in rural evangelism and the nurturing of agricultural leaders, so he began teaching at the newly established Rural Evangelical Seminary. In 1959, he participated in the East Asian Christian Council meeting in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, where it was unanimously decided that the pressing need of the time was for the development of rural leaders to help rebuild war-ravaged Asian countries and that churches in Japan should help with this. In recognition of this, the Kyodan established the “Southeast Asian Course” at Rural Evangelical Seminary, with Takami taking a leading role. In 1973, the seminary moved to Nishi Nasuno in Tochigi Prefecture to establish an independent entity known as Asian Rural Institute. Takami laid its foundations as its first president and served as its spiritual leader until his retirement in 1993. Following retirement he continued to serve as honorary president, working to further develop ARI.

In the background of this decision by the church in Japan to take on this task, under Takami’s leadership, was the issue of war responsibility for what Japan had done under its military government in the first half of the 20th century, as it invaded the Asian countries of that time: China, Taiwan, Korea, Burma, Indonesia, the Philippines, and the Pacific Islands. This dragged all of these countries into World War II, resulting in the loss of many lives and the destruction of their economies. This goal of a world government under the Japanese emperor resulted in the usurping of these peoples’ freedom and sovereignty, and the church in Japan succumbed to the pressure of the state to participate in the pacification of these lands under Japan’s harsh occupation. Thus, the church in Japan felt compelled to repent of its wartime actions and take responsibility through concrete actions of atonement, not withdrawing in fear of denunciation, but pursuing the gospel of reconciliation shown by Christ through his atonement on the cross for the forgiveness of all sin.

Every year, about 30 trainees from around the world come to ARI for a nine-month period of study, which includes Christians as well as rural leaders who are Buddhists and Muslims. Their purpose is not only to learn advanced Japanese agricultural techniques but also to learn traditional farming methods that have been developed in these countries in order to develop sustainable agriculture that maximizes the power of nature. Through the communal living of eating and studying together while working as a team to grow food and raise animals, these people from different backgrounds—with different languages, religions, and customs and often with strong personalities—overcome their initial hesitation and learn how to live together as they listen to and dialog with each other and work towards the common goal of maximizing sustainable agriculture. This process develops within them the spirit of servant leadership that they can take back to their own societies to become a force towards developing their own active communities. Already some 1,200 graduates have returned to countries around the world and testify to how their experiences at ARI have served them well.

Takami Toshihiro dedicated his life to developing a community based on love and peace, where each individual’s gifts were utilized to release the inherent power of the world God has created, as opposed to a society focused on wealth and power that is based on the love of power and things. In his faith and wisdom, we can see the life of one who tried to live as an ambassador of reconciliation faithful to the word of God. (Tr. TB)

—Akiyama Toru, general secretary

アジア学院の高見敏弘先生のこと

 2019年を迎え、教団でもクリスマスに洗礼を受けてキリスト共に復活の命にあずかった人たちの喜びの声が多くの教会から聞こえてきます。超高齢化して伝道力が低下している教会、また、宗教的なことに対する無関心や警戒がひろがっている日本の社会の中で、それぞれの教会で新しくキリストのものとされた命が生まれているのを聞くことは大きな励ましになります。新しく生まれた命が和解の使者として世界に遣わされるために、神に選ばれた器として用いられて生涯を全うするように祈ります。

 2018年9月に91歳で天に召された高見敏弘先生のことを思い起こします。「アジア学院」の創立者としてアジア、アフリカ、太平洋諸国、南アメリカなどから集められた農業指導者の研修のために尽くされた牧師、また教師です。12月16日にアジア学院でお別れの会が開かれ、世界各国から集まったアジア学院の卒業生、支援者、日本の関係者が共にその生涯を思い起こし、この人を主の御用のために呼び出し用いてくださった主なる神に感謝をしました。

 高見先生は、満州(撫順)で生まれ、第二次世界大戦後に引き揚げて来られ、貧しさのゆえに京都の禅寺で修業の生活をしながら中学に通われました。卒業後は行商や沖中仕、塩焚きなどの重労働をされました。その中で宣教師の家庭のコックをするというチャンスがあり、キリストにふれ、やがて洗礼を受けてキリスト者になる波乱にとんだ若い時代をすごされました。やがて生涯をキリストにささげ伝道者になりたいとの志が与えられ、アメリカのドーン大学やコネチカット大学、イエール大学神学部などで学ばれ牧師になられました。

 帰国後、日本の農村の伝道と農業指導者の養成に使命を感じられ、そのころ設立された農村伝道神学校で教えられることになりました。1959年にクアラルンプールで東南アジアキリスト教協議会(EACC)が開かれたとき、荒廃したアジア諸国の戦後復興のために農村指導者の養成訓練が急務であるとの認識が高まり、この任務の遂行を日本の教会に期待する決議が、全会一致でなされました。これを受けて1960年に教団は農村伝道神学校に「東南アジア農村指導者養成所」を開設します。高見先生はこの事業の中心となられました。1973年に西那須野の地に移り、農村伝道神学校から独立して「学校法人アジア学院」となると、高見敏弘先生が院長に就任。学院の精神的支柱として基盤を築かれ、1993年に引退の後も、名誉院長として学院の発展に尽くされました。

 高見先生をはじめ日本の教会がこの任務を引き受けようと決意した背景には、日本が20世紀前半、軍事政権の下で中国・台湾・朝鮮・ミャンマーやインドネシア、フィリピンなど東南アジア、太平洋諸国などに侵略し、戦渦に巻き込み、多くの人の命を奪い物資を奪った戦争責任の問題があります。天皇を中心とした世界国家にするとの野望を抱いてアジア諸国の自由と主権を奪い、過酷な植民地支配を続ける中で、日本の教会も国家の統制に服し宣撫工作に協力するなど、この戦争に加担したとの罪責と悔い改めの意識から、贖罪の業としてこの責任を果たしたいとの強い自覚が働いていたと言われています。糾弾を恐れて頑なに閉じこもるのではなく、すべての罪がキリストの贖罪によって赦されているゆえに、諸国への謝罪の思いと言葉と共に、キリストによって示された和解の福音を身をもって表すことに命をかける方向へと、進んでいったのです。

 アジア学院では、毎年世界各国からキリスト者だけでなく仏教者やイスラム教徒も含めた研修生30人前後が、9か月の研修期間を過ごします。日本の進んだ農業技術を学ぶだけでなく、各国で培われてきた伝統的な農業技術も学びながら、自然の力を生かした持続的な農業について実践して学びます。さらに、宗教も生活習慣や言葉も違い、それぞれ強烈な個性を持った人たちが、始めは戸惑いながらも、食を共にし、教室で学び、作物や畜産の作業をチィームで行ううちに、次第に他者の存在を認め、耳を傾け、語り合って、社会の中で共同の働きを進める為の、基本的な関係作りを学びます。これがサーヴァント・リーダーとしてそれぞれの社会に帰って働く時に、生きた共同体をつくる原動力になっていきます。世界中に戻っていった約1200人の修了者が、口々にアジア学院で経験したことがどんなに大切なことであったかを語っています。

 高見敏弘先生は、物欲と支配欲に駆られ富と権力を志向する社会とは全く別の、神が創造された世界がもっている潜在的な力と、一人一人の賜物が豊かに用いられる、愛と平和に満ちた共同体形成に力を尽くされました。そこに先生の熱い信仰と知恵と、和解の使者として生きよとのみことばに忠実に従った生涯を見ることができます。
(秋山徹)

【December 2018 No.400】Christmas: A Time to Celebrate the Birth of our Savior

 by Chibana Sugako, Kyodan missionary

                                                                                                        Sakai Keishi Memorial Church

                                                                                                        Pirapo Free Methodist Church, Paraguay

 

Every year Christmas is celebrated around the world. Here in Paraguay, the Christmas vacation begins in mid-December. People who are working far from home use this time to return to their hometowns to celebrate Christmas and enjoy being with family. Once Christmas Eve becomes Christmas Day, people light fireworks, and the greetings “Felicidades de navidad!” (Merry Christmas) can be heard.

Why is Christmas a time to celebrate? Is it because families are able to come together to see each other and celebrate their growth and safety? Of course, that is something to celebrate. However, the real reason for celebration is something else. The reason is that good news “which will bring great joy to all the people” (Luke 2:10b) was announced. That good news was the birth of our savior, the news that Jesus Christ has come from Heaven to dwell with us on earth. Therefore, at Christmas we remember this event and worship together. Christmas literally means “Christ’s Mass,” or “the worship of Christ.”

The events of that first Christmas are recorded in the Gospel of Luke. On a winter evening, angels appeared and, in an instant, a dark sky became as bright as noonday. The angels announced the joyful news of the birth of the savior. This news was first announced to poor shepherds. It seems that shepherds were looked down upon by the average Jew in those days, and generally avoided. They were poor, with no social standing. However, it was to these poor and powerless people that God first chose to share the good news of Christmas.

After the angels announced the birth of the savior to the shepherds, they told them, “You will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger.” As the surprised shepherds looked upward, a great army of angels gathered, singing “Glory to God in the highest heaven” in loud voices of praise.

So what do you think the shepherds did after they heard the chorus of angels? Did they doubt the angels, saying “There is no way that our savior will be born in the manger of a stable.” No they didn’t. They believed the angels and quickly took action. They hurried to the stable where they found Joseph, Mary, and the baby Jesus. With their own eyes they were able to see Christ.

After that, “The shepherds went back, singing praises to God for all they had heard and seen; it had been just as the angel had told them.” (Luke 2:20) In this way, the first Christmas was presented to us by poor shepherds who dwelt at the lowest level of society. After praising the baby Jesus with great joy, they returned to their homes. But they did not keep their joy to themselves, they shared their story of Jesus’ birth with everyone they met. In other words, they were evangelists. It’s a great story, isn’t it!

These shepherds did not yet know how salvation through this baby would work, but I believe that their experience had given them the conviction that this child would remember them and save them. Those of us living today know how Jesus saved us. Yes, we know that our salvation came through the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus. Christ, through giving his life in our place on the cross, has atoned for our sins. And through his resurrection on the third day, our sins have been forgiven, and we have been given eternal life.

We are certain that Christ came to earth. And Christ has told us, “I will be with you always, to the end of the age.” (Matt. 28:20) Because the Lord is always beside us, there is no reason to fear death, nor is there a need for us to fear what the future holds for us. Rather, let us depend upon the Lord, and like the shepherds, let us praise Him as we continue our Christian journey. (Tr. JS)

 

ピラポ自由メソジスト 酒井兄姉記念教会

知花スガ子

   ルカによる福音書2章8-20節

 クリスマスおめでとうございます。

 毎年、世界各地でクリスマスが祝われます。ここパラグアイでは12月半ばからクリスマス休暇となります。出身地から遠くはなれて生活している人々は、この期間に帰省し、家族と一緒にクリスマスを祝い楽しく過ごします。クリスマスイブから日付が変わるころ、方々で花火が打ち上げられ「Felicidades de navidad!(クリスマスおめでとう)」の声も高らかに聞こえてきます。

 クリスマスはなぜめでたいのでしょうか。久しぶりに家族の者が一堂に集まりお互いの成長や無事を確認できて嬉しくて祝っているのでしょうか。もちろんそれもあるでしょう。けれども本当にめでたい理由は他にあるのです。

 それは、「民全体に与えられる大きな喜び(ルカ2:12)」が告げられたからです。この大きな喜びとは、そうです。私たちのために救い主(キリスト)がお生まれになったこと、救い主が天からこの地上に来られた出来事です。クリスマスは「キリストのミサ」、「キリストを礼拝する」という意味です。ですから教会では、クリスマスにこの出来事を覚え礼拝するのです。

 ルカ福音書には、最初のクリスマスの事が記されています。

 ある冬の夜、天使が現れ暗い夜空がたちまち真昼のように輝き、救い主がお生まれになったという大きな喜びを告げました。この喜びが最初に告げられたのは、貧しい羊飼いたちです。当時、羊を飼う仕事は一般のユダヤ人から見下され、敬遠されていたようです。羊飼いたちは、社会的地位も低く、貧しかったのです。そのような弱く貧しい人々を神は、真っ先に顧みられたのです。

 天使は救い主の誕生を彼らに告げ、さらに「あなたがたは、布にくるまって飼い葉桶の中に寝ている乳飲み子を見つけるであろう」

と言います。驚いて天を見上げていると今度は先の天使に突如天の軍勢が加わり、

 「いと高きところに栄光、神にあれ」

と、賛美の声が高らかに響きました。その光景に羊飼いたちはさぞ驚いたことでしょう。

 さて、この大合唱を聞いた羊飼いたちは、その後どうしたでしょう。「救い主が家畜小屋で生まれ、飼い葉桶のなかにいるはずはない」と天使の言葉を疑ったのでしょうか?いいえ、そうではありません。彼らは信じたのです。そして、すぐさま行動しました。ヨセフとマリアのいる家畜小屋、救い主なるキリストが眠るところへと急いだのです。そして、その目でキリストを見ることができたのです。

 それから「羊飼いたちは、見聞きしたことがすべて天使が話したとおりだったので、神をあがめ、賛美しながら帰って行った」のです。

 このように最初のクリスマスは、貧しく、社会の底辺で暮らしていた羊飼いたちによって捧げられました。彼らは、大喜びで幼子イエスを賛美した後、帰路に着きますが、この喜びを自分たちだけのものとせず、幼子について人々に知らせた、つまり伝道したのです。すばらしいですね。

 彼らは自分たちが見た幼子が、どのようにして自分たちを救ってくださるかは知りませんでした。しかし、彼らは、この方が自分たちを顧み、必ず救ってくださるという確信を得たのではないでしょうか。

 今を生きる私たちは、キリストがどのように私たちを救ってくださったかを知っています。そうです。その救いは十字架と復活によってです。キリストが、ご自分の命と引き換えに私たちの罪を贖い、3日目に復活されたことで、私たちは罪赦され、永遠の命を与えられたのです。

 キリストは確かに来られました。そして、その主は「世の終わりまでいつもあなたがたと共にいる」(マタイ28:20)とおっしゃっています。その主が側におられるのですから、もう死を恐れる必要はありませんし、将来のことを思い悩む必要もありません。その主に依り頼み、羊飼いたちがしたように主を賛美しながら歩んで行こうではありませんか。